Alzheimer’s Manifesto

 LOOSE THE STIGMA

People suffering from Alzheimer’s experience the limitations of their disease everyday. Instead of focussing on their limitations, acknowledge what they can still experience and create space improves their quality of life. Be constructive in tone.

 ENCOURAGE HUMAN ENCOUNTER

Create an environment that stimulates human interaction, a place where generations can meet. It contributes to a sense of belonging to society and has a positive effect on wellbeing.

INTEGRATE A PATHFINDER

 Alzheimer patients often have difficulty finding their way and orientating through a space. Create a sensory pathfinder that can operate as a compass, relieving stress and anxiety.

ACCESS THE GREAT OUTDOORS

Create access to an attractive outdoor space, that celebrate flora and fauna as integral part of our natural surrounding. A place to wander and wonder.

CREATE ‘SOFT’ SAFETY

Safety is an essential condition in environments for vulnerable users.  Yet simply locking doors, often leads to negative experience by patients.  Instead, create different filters that maintain relative freedom to move within the complex.

ADDRESS ALL SENSES

 taking all senses in account (sensory experiment -> which senses are most important?) sensory memory how to translate senses and experiences to architecture collectivity and individuality

 MAKE IT VISIBLE

                   No more hiding, no more concealing, no more exiling, Alzheimer should be part of our everyday life…The visibility is essential.

  RELATION TO PUBLIC

Introduce Alzheimer’s to everyday life by making parts of the institute public.

CREATE PRIVACY

At the same time Alzheimer’s should also have their private space. The level of intervention should be controlled

ALL ARE EQUAL

No preconception, no hierarchy, no discrimination, we should treat Alzheimer’s as the way we want others to treat us.

 BLEND INTO NATURE

As we put our feet on ground and breath a fresh air, we are always longing for the nature, why not blended into the nature?

INTEGRATE DAYLIGHT

 Surround the patients with daylight. Vitamin D from the sun is good for everyones health.

MAINTAIN A SENSE OF FREEDOM

 Let the patient spend time outside each day or at least get them fresh air. Give the patients the sense of freedom by giving them the space to walk around freely. If possible also let them go out.

MULTIPLE CHOICE ACTIVITES

 Design the space for them which makes them undertake their own plans during the day. Create an environment that stimulates the people to actively participate in daily (living) activities. Provide activities.

LET THEM WATCH

 Design the spaces so that the more observing patients can watch the more active undertaking patients.

PREVENT BORED TABLESETTING

 The patients should live in a habitat where in they are tempted to not be mentally passive. Prevent them for sitting bored at a table without having anything to do.

STIMULATE INTERACTION AND PARTICIPATION

Turning nursing-homes inside out (now they are mostly turned inwards) stimulating participation of surrounding environment getting the disease out of isolation Alzheimer café kind of solutions

 OPEN THE DIALOGUE

Caretakers, Daytime Activity Workers, Doctors, Patient, Friends and Family

FUTURE PROOF DESIGN

Aging of society will come and go, patients will come and go, taking different phases of the disease into account, taking different personalities in account, ‘Presentie Theorie’

RHYTHM OF THE DAY

Daylight is important to help set the body clock.  It is what keeps our normal day and light rhythm.  people with Alzheimer’s often turn night into day.  Having good access to daylight will help keep the balance

MAKE IT DEAD OBVIOUS

Any of us have difficulties moments when we are trying to find our way around unfamiliar places.  If you have Alzheimer’s it is even more difficult to work things out.  Make it easy for a person with Alzheimer’s to work thing out.  Make it dead obvious.

GO EASY ON THE EYES

Dementia patients are often older with sight impairments. Contrast in color or material to differentiate surfaces help them see better and recognize their environment.

CREATE AURAL FILTERS

Noise can be diabling for people who are confused.  Declutter the auditory environment by amplify sound and reduce noise.

FACILITATE CARETAKERS

Do not forget the (informal) caretakers within the design for an Alzheimer’s habitat.

 CELEBRATE THE VOYEUR

Voyeuristic elements within the design stimulate the playful aspect between the patients.

 CREATE SOCIETAL INVOLVEMENT

Societal involvement is needed to make Alzheimer’s patients more visible.

STAGE THE PATIENT

Create a platform or stage for Alzheimer patients, they need to be seen, heard, and learned from.  If communicating in the traditional way does not work, invest and experiment with other ways of expression.  The design should stimulate the voice of the patient.

ACKNOWLEDGE DIFFERENCES

Rooms should be designed according to the types of Alzheimer’s Patients. (Wanderer, Zen-demented person, Balance Seeker)

TAKE IT SERIOUS

 People suffering from Alzheimer’s experience loss of power in their life considering small and big decisions. Ask Alzheimer patients what they need and want and take their opinion serious, instead of projecting our own ideas on them.

GO BEYOND OBVIOUS

 Explore what may be lay hidden. Design what may exist. Indicate what may be ignored

 GET INTO THEIR WORLD

Think what they think, Feel what they feel, Experience what they experience. Understand the beauty of the other world.